Oxford Studies in Digital Politics: A Book Series from Oxford University Press (Series Editor: Andrew Chadwick)

Digital communication technologies are now central to our understanding of political, social, economic, and cultural life. Initiated in 2008, this book series brings together scholars with an interest in understanding the information and communication environments which shape - and are shaped by - politics and policy-making. The series is concerned with theoretical and conceptual debates, political institutions and behavior, and policy issues. It provides an important, high-profile publishing outlet for a range of talented authors, both established and up-and-coming.

Books in the series analyze the politics of new communication technologies, broadly defined. Books summarize and criticize existing literature as well as provide new departures. The field itself is currently undergoing a shift, as the impact of web 2.0, social networking, citizen journalism and related trends requires fresh perspectives.

The first book in the series, Philip N. Howard's prize-winning The Digital Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy: Information Technology and Political Islam, was published in 2010. As of 2015 seventeen books had been published in the series, six of which had been awarded distinguished international book awards.

Click here for a current snapshot of the series, including published and forthcoming titles.

For further details and information on how to submit a proposal, please visit the OUP Studies in Digital Politics website.